3 FAIL-PROOF TECHNIQUES TO LIGHT YOUR CAMP FIRE

WORDS BY MICHAEL BORG WITH CAMPER TRAILER LIFESTYLE

Camping isn’t much fun without the glow of a campfire, especially if it’s in the middle of winter. So, it makes sense to learn the art of getting a great campfire going, even if the odds are stacked against you. Yep, if you want to be the one that gets the fire roaring when all your mates are struggling, these are the three fail-proof techniques to get it done.    

THE TEE-PEE

Perhaps the most popular of fire building techniques, the Tee-Pee is as simple as they come. Simply arrange your kindling in a circle with the base spread out and the tops of the sticks meeting at the tip. Put your fire starters or inside the tee-pee in the centre. Now the trick is not to add too many layers to the outside of the tee-pee as you need to allow gaps for the oxygen to be drawn in to feed the fire. 

As the fire takes hold and grows, you can add more layers increasing the diameter of the wood as you go.   

LEAN-TO

Kick this one off by laying one medium sized log on the ground where you want the fire to be built. Then, start laying your kindling sticks down with one end on the ground and the other end on the log. Place your fire starters under the kindling and light it up! Once again, the idea is to allow the fire to draw the oxygen in from the bottom. The particular method allows you to keep adding wood to the top without blocking the oxygen from entering from the bottom. Plus, it starts heating the larger main log right from the start as well.   

THE JANGA BOX  

If you can’t get a fire going with this technique, it’s time to quit camping! Simply start by putting your fire starters on the ground and layering up your sticks around them to build a square by placing two sticks parallel to each other with a gap between them. Then, place another two sticks on top of them facing the other way and continue doing so until the structure/box starts to lose its stability. If the wood is nice and dry, a good technique is to build the fire upside down by putting the larger logs on the bottom and placing your fire starters and kindling at the top. Once lit, the fire will burn downward direction, effectively feeding itself.